Rolling Without Limits

Your mobility may be limited. Your voice, boundless.

Applying for Social Security Disability as an Adult
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Applying for Social Security Disability as an Adult

This post is for those who are applying for Social Security Benefits as adults. These individuals actually encompass 80% of those who apply. First, unless Social Security confirms with your doctors that you are internally ill, you are not going to receive benefits right away. The sad fact is, the government does not seem to want to pay out to those who are disabled and living. Nor do they want to pay out to Senior Citizens who have earned the right to have a peaceful retirement during the golden years they have left.

We want a helping hand, not a hand out. We were turned down as kids, because our parent(s) were making over $40,000.00 per year, but it’s even harder to get Disability as a seventeen year old or disabled adult. All this, despite the fact that we are often in a very low income bracket in most cases.

What Does This Mean for Those Who Are With Wheelchairs and Scooters?

I was told on more than once  from Social Security, that those with wheelchairs do not have the same rights to benefits as the deaf and the blind do. Their reason is that these individuals came out and fought for their rights in the thousands, with their organizations backing them, while those with wheelchairs did not. There's no doubt, mobility is an issue here.

For young adults with wheelchairs who were turned down for benefits when their parent(s) were making over $40,000 a year, getting approved for benefits is challenging. It shouldn’t be this way. To start off with, you haven’t been working for ten  years to pay into Social Security to get decent SSD benefits. So, they may start you off with SSI, which doesn’t pay much. Plus this money gets deducted when you go back to work and make over sixty dollars a week.

For those of you who went into a wheelchair later in life, you will get paid more securely with SSD benefits if you elect to have Social Security benefits and you’re approved. With the benefits, if you want the “Back To Work Ticket”, you’re allowed to earn up to your assigned limit from Social Security, for your second income.

Getting approved for Social Security benefits as an adult, takes three to five years in most cases. The same holds true for most people with wheelchairs and scooters. You have to stop working and say that you can’t work, according to how Social Security defines disability. Your medical team has to sign for you, saying that you can’t work. You will likely be turned down three times. You must appeal all three of them. Then get a SSD lawyer, who you don’t pay out of pocket. They take one third of the retroactive monies that they win for you. In most cases, you would have to be on Social Security benefits to be approved for a subsidized wheelchair equipped apartment to rent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you like this, please vote and comment. I like reading your comments.

Leave a Comment

  1. SignLanguage
    Great read! Voted!
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you.
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  2. Lil Nana
    Lil Nana
    Great blog...it's sad how hard they make it to quailify...people need the help and yet they tell them no...I don't get it???
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Don't bother trying to understand the US Government. In most situations, they haven't taken the steps to understand and get it right. When it's not making them money and they can't deal with it, they put it in the bottom of the huge pile causing the deficit to go up....For those with with wheelchairs: Not all their hospital bills are covered and they have to pay in the $100,000.s back. They have to pay for some of their medications that are expensive. They have to pay more than the normal person for the services and equipment that they need. Adaptable places to live, are hard to get into. Transportation... The list goes on. It's definitely unfair. Hat's off to the heroes in wheelchairs fighting for your survival. Never give in.
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  3. Broken English
    Broken English
    Voted. Great blog. It is very sad to hear about this situation though.
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  4. Teresa Thomas
    Teresa Thomas
    Vote #5. I will agree with this one 100%... It is very hard and sad to see this happening to people who needs the help and can't get it. Great job on this Susan.
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  5. Rene
    Rene
    Voted. Great blog! Please check out Everything in Moderation, vote & comment if you like it. Thanks! :)
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you Rene. I stopped by yours and voted too.
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  6. sweedly
    sweedly
    Voted. I understand the problems faced trying to get SSD, then living on the small amount that is given to you.
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you. For me, it's been rollacoaster ride! Those with wheelchairs and other disabled people,have far more expenses than me. I'm sure.
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  7. mike ritter
    This is actually a biased article with hearsay. While your and others' experience with the Social Security Administration may have been extremely frustrating and disappointing, their criteria are stringent for a reason: to prevent fraud and ensure individuals are truly unable to earn an income due to a chronic disability. Because one uses a mobility device or the type of device they use does not determine disability. As you allude, many apply for benefits to receive assistance with mobility equipment or accessible housing. The requirements for earnings are virtual poverty. This leaves many hopeful recipients who want to contribute but just need some assistance torn. Dealing with SSA requires preparation. Getting approved for SSDI may take several attempts and a lot of advocacy. Once one is receiving disability benefits the transition back to the workforce is difficult too. The Ticket To Work program is their path for recipients to try working without losing benefits. SSA works closely with state agencies to coordinate these efforts. Learn more at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/work/
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Mike, I respect your opinion in that you work for them. The blind and the deaf fought for their Social Security disability rights in the US is fact, not hearsay. The Blind won in 1964, during the Kennedy administration to be labeled as visually impaired instead of disabled and to collect more benefits because it is harder for them to work, plus pay all their medical and travel expenses.
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