Rolling Without Limits

Your mobility may be limited. Your voice, boundless.

Happy Holidays! Give a Hug To Someone in a Wheel Chair Today
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Happy Holidays! Give a Hug To Someone in a Wheel Chair Today

Ho ho ho! Santa does not exist! Ho ho ho!

But you do!

Somewhere in your community today, there's a person in a wheel chair longing to be loved and hugged. That person could be in a wheel chair for his or her first Christmas. Give that person a hug and do spead some genuine holiday cheer by spending some time with that person. 

More than that, you can give the gift of hope. But how exactly can you do something like that? Hope is an intangible thing and it cannot be bought in Walmart. It has to come from the well spring of good inside all of us that we may share it. The thing is, we can only share something if we have it.

Today is December 22nd, and by now people are rushing around to buy gifts. It's all about the mayhem, the chaos, the rumble and tumble and the noise.

Now, let me ask you this question, "Where's the hope in all of that?"

How can you find hope in chaos and manic behavior?

But you already know the answer to that... :P

Perhaps, another person that needs some care and attention too are those who are giving care and attention to people in wheelchairs. Not every caregiver is tasked with an equal ward. 

Some are blessed with more than just patients, and become friends.

But then, it's an unfortunate reality that some, if not many of wheelchair bound people have been through traumatic circumstances leading to difficult personalities. This makes the caregiver's job more challenging if not stressful.

If you're on a wheelchair and have been this "challenging person" once in your life, now would be a good time to repay the kindness that's been given. Remember, the person who once gave you the care that you needed also needs some care. 

2012: 'Tis a Hard Year

This year has been a pretty pretty rough one and they seem to be getting tougher as they go along eh? But yeah, as much as people and nature are the ones that made it tough for most of us this year, it's also people and nature that can heal the wounds that have been inflicted. 

A universal cure that I've come across that works through the coldest of nights and through the fiercest of storms is that potent mixture called love and hope. 

Unlike the gift certificate that you could use in the mall, unlike the 50% discounts offered all over, unlike all the coupons and what not that you could find - hope and love, when combined spring inexhaustibly. You only need to find it in yourself - wheelchair bound or not - to freely give it away. 

___________

Hey hey! Happy Holidays everyone!

Hello Rolling Without Limits!

I do mean this with the sincerest desire to make you happy - spread some love, spread some hope. Pass em around! Remember that potent spring inside of you that never runs out and let it flow.  

 

Leave a Comment

  1. pftsusan
    pftsusan
    #4. I think paying it forwards, by giving to others in need, improves the quality of life for both parties. Well said.
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    1. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Thank you for the vote ma'am :)
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  2. sweedly
    sweedly
    I like your writing style, it inspires hope and faith that there are others out willing to help and care for those in need, and the hope that people in need will be willing to accept the care giving with grace and dignity. #7
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    1. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Thank you Sweedly :)
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  3. Wheelz
    As a wheelchair-user, I think this article is condescending and patronizing.
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    1. Poodlelady
      I agree. See my own comment about 8 or 9 comments down.
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  4. Wheelz
    As a wheelchair-user, I think this article is condescending and patronizing.
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  5. Wheelz
    I'm sorry to multi-post that. I am new on this site.
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  6. softheart53
    I'm new to this site & I inadvertently gave this a vote. I have been a quad for 35 years...Give someone a hug that's in a wheelchair??? Why??? We are not a charity case! Come on! Shame on you....
    Log in to reply.
  7. softheart53
    I'm new to this site & I inadvertently gave this a vote. I have been a quad for 35 years...Give someone a hug that's in a wheelchair??? Why??? We are not a charity case! Come on! Shame on you....
    Log in to reply.
  8. softheart53
    I'm new to this site & I inadvertently gave this a vote. I have been a quad for 35 years...Give someone a hug that's in a wheelchair??? Why??? We are not a charity case! Come on! Shame on you....
    Log in to reply.
  9. softheart53
    I'm new to this site & I inadvertently gave this a vote. I have been a quad for 35 years...Give someone a hug that's in a wheelchair??? Why??? We are not a charity case! Come on! Shame on you....
    Log in to reply.
  10. softheart53
    I'm new to this site & I inadvertently gave this a vote. I have been a quad for 35 years...Give someone a hug that's in a wheelchair??? Why??? We are not a charity case! Come on! Shame on you....
    Log in to reply.
  11. Poodlelady
    Daniel Andrei Garcia -- Although I'm sure you meant well, as an educated person who happens to be in a wheelchair, I have to say that this article is not only extremely condescending, but also downright dangerous. First, just because a person moves around on wheels instead of by putting one foot in front of the other does not mean that they are sad, lonely or in need of a hug. To assume so about me, or anyone in a chair, is to assume that my life is somehow less, and frankly, as a college educated, gainfully employed, debt-free disabled person, that assumption is highly insulting. Second of all, people in chairs often suffer from various conditions that could be compromised by a hug from a stranger. Case in point: I have a brittle bone disease. An unwanted hug could easily result in broken ribs. Some other people in chairs may have compromised immune systems. An unwanted hug from a stranger could result in that person catching a virus that could land them in the hospital. All in all, I think this "give someone in a wheelchair a hug" is about the most insulting advice I've ever read. However, if you or someone you know insists on carrying through with this ridiculous endeavor, by all means, at least ASK THE PERSON, FIRST. Their well being (not to mention their self-esteem) may depend on it.
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  12. Poodlelady
    Daniel Andrei Garcia -- Although I'm sure you meant well, as an educated person who happens to be in a wheelchair, I have to say that this article is not only extremely condescending, but also downright dangerous. First, just because a person moves around on wheels instead of by putting one foot in front of the other does not mean that they are sad, lonely or in need of a hug. To assume so about me, or anyone in a chair, is to assume that my life is somehow less, and frankly, as a college educated, gainfully employed, debt-free disabled person, that assumption is highly insulting. Second of all, people in chairs often suffer from various conditions that could be compromised by a hug from a stranger. Case in point: I have a brittle bone disease. For me, an unwanted hug could easily result in broken ribs. Some other people in chairs may have compromised immune systems. An unwanted hug from a stranger could result in that person catching a virus that could land them in the hospital. All in all, I think this "give someone in a wheelchair a hug" is about the most insulting advice I've ever read. However, if you or someone you know insists on carrying through with this ridiculous endeavor, by all means, at least ASK THE PERSON, FIRST. Their well being (not to mention their self-esteem) may depend on it.
    Log in to reply.
    1. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      I apologize for the "wrong" thing on this article. I really do meant well. "Give people a hug" was a thing back then and so I just added "Give people in wheelchairs" a hug. If Rolling Without Limits deems it, then please do delete the article and again, apologies for some hurt feelings. No harm intended, Merry Christmas.
      Log in to reply.
      1. Poodlelady
        As I said previously, I'm sure you meant well. My guess is that you yourself are not disabled? Am I correct? In your bio, it mentions that you’re a freelance writer, so I'm guessing that what you are trying to do is write about many subjects in an effort to get your work seen on as many sites as possible. If that's the case, that's great; there’s nothing wrong with trying to get your name out there. However, if I'm correct on that assumption, then as a retired English teacher (and occasional article contributor on other websites), let me give you one piece of advice that I used to give my Creative Writing and Journalism students: Write about what you know! It's a well-worn piece of advice that I'm sure you've heard before, but it's well-worn because it's true. If you do wish to write about a subject that you know little about, then the appropriate way to do that is to interview as many people as possible from the subset you're writing about - and make sure their background, education, employment and life experiences are varied (i.e., in the case of people with disabilities, don't just interview a bunch of people from a nursing home, for example, and assume THAT's the disabled perspective). In disability circles, there is a saying: Nothing about us without us. However, I tend to think this is a good rule for any group within a culture. When writing about any subset of the populace that isn’t native to you, gain multiple perspectives. Still, the best advice for any writer, I think, is to write about your own life experiences, and the issues with which you personally have had some experience. Not only will you avoid coming off as naïve or condescending, but your pieces will ring true not only with those who are similar to you, but you’ll be able to give outsiders the opportunity to see YOUR WORLD through a different lens. Best of luck with that.
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        1. Daniel Andrei Garcia
          Daniel Andrei Garcia
          Thank you for the educational piece of advice and criticism. As you can see, I have not written here for quite some time. ~ Write about what I know the most. Okay, if I followed that advice then I would have to go with a posteriori knowledge - write about things that I have personally seen or experienced. I live in a poor country, the Philippines. If I wrote about that, then the tone of my work would be totally different. It would be sadder. That's why I write about things that may be a little politically incorrect - but you know, look around you. People want to be politically correct all the time. Anyway, without going further into other discussions, your point is well taken. Thank you for educating me. You can trust that you won't find me here anymore. This would be my last reply here.
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          1. Poodlelady
            But why not write about the Philippines, Daniel. You could write about the culture there, how things are different from the U.S., and maybe it would be sadder, but guess what? Americans don't just want to read lighthearted, funny stories. The best pieces that get the most exposure are the hard hitting pieces about serious issues. People here eat that stuff up! I'll bet a lot of readers would value the information that you could provide, first hand. Saying "write about what you know" was not meant as an insult. It's the best advice given to all writers. You could be educating Americans about what it's like over there, and providing a first-hand perspective of things there that people here had never thought of. You are cheating yourself out of a lot of good articles by trying to write about random things that you think people want to hear, and ignoring all of the amazing topics that are right outside your door. You should really think about it.
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    2. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      I apologize for the "wrong" thing on this article. I really do meant well. "Give people a hug" was a thing back then and so I just added "Give people in wheelchairs" a hug. If Rolling Without Limits deems it, then please do delete the article and again, apologies for some hurt feelings. No harm intended, Merry Christmas.
      Log in to reply.
    3. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      I apologize for the "wrong" thing on this article. I really do meant well. "Give people a hug" was a thing back then and so I just added "Give people in wheelchairs" a hug. If Rolling Without Limits deems it, then please do delete the article and again, apologies for some hurt feelings. No harm intended, Merry Christmas.
      Log in to reply.
    4. Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Daniel Andrei Garcia
      Giving people random people - random hugs was a thing back then, which inspired me to write this. As you can see, it was written in 2012. I apologize if it sounded condescending. That is honestly, not my intention.
      Log in to reply.
  13. Gideons Revenge
    Um, yeah...I can't even...were you high when wrote this? Have a little self-respect. There is nothing wrong with you and you don't need anyone's charity. We have fought really hard for the right to education, employment, reproductive rights, etc. so that we can rule our own destinies and not have to worry about people "helping" us or "hugging" us because our poor, miserable lives must be so hard. Everyone has disabilities, and everyone has abilities. And if you insist of thinking of yourself or others as "different" because of visible or "significant" disability, remember that not only do people with disabilities make up the largest minority group on the planet - 15% of the world's population or 1 million people - it is also the only minority group you can join at any time and you will if you live long enough. I'm sure you meant well, but please stop reinforcing stereotypes that the temporarily able-bodied have about people who use wheelchairs. And take some time to learn about the disability rights movement and disability culture. Have a great holiday.
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