Rolling Without Limits

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The Rights Series: SSDI Benefits For Children with Disabilities
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The Rights Series: SSDI Benefits For Children with Disabilities

When you have children who are disabled, they might qualify for Social Security Insurance Benefits (SSI). They must be under 18. Or you can apply for an adult child with a disability, who is living with you and get Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for them under your Social Security benefits, in which they will get paid more each month.

When you apply for your child, they have to qualify under Social Security’s definition of them being disabled. That is they would have to have the disability or disease for longer than 12 months. The condition has to hold them back from doing activities of daily normal functioning. Your income has to be contingent with Social Security’s rules for your child to be approved. When the child’s parent(s) are making an income of over $40,000.00 a year, your child may be denied benefits. The parents must be within the Social Security income limits for their children to qualify. That is $28,000.00 or less a year.

Unfortunately the one thing that will qualify your child for immediate SSI is that they are expected to die from their disease. That’s very disheartening of the government. Diseases and conditions that are on the top of the list to get your child approved for SSI are:

   • Total Blindness

   • Total Deafness

   • HIV

   • Muscular dystrophy

   • Downs syndrome

   • Severe Cerebral Palsy

   • Severe Intellectual Disorders (by age 7)

   • Birth weight below 2 lbs. 10 ounces

Social Security does take in the umbrella of disabilities as long as it fits their rules. Other conditions that child has, might take 3 appeals, than an SSI lawyer to get them in. You don’t pay the lawyer at all.

Once your child is approved, they will receive a school allowance if they are away at school in addition to their monthly benefits. They will be re-evaluated once every three years to see if they still qualify according the Social Security Disability rules.

Ref: Social Security Publication

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  1. Lil Nana
    Lil Nana
    Out of votes for today, but will vote tomorrow...shared it on fb
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you Audrey.
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  2. Teresa Thomas
    Teresa Thomas
    Vote #2... Very good indeed on this thought Susan. I have a 26 year old that is in a group home, that will be getting his benefits for the rest of his life. Now, I just need to find out how to get my oldest son going on this very thing as well. I have found a letter, that he had signed which, gave me the permission to look at his medical records. It is currently, out dated, but that's not a problem. I will update it and get him going on this thing. Maybe then, my youngest son can move out on his own. At the moment, my youngest son is the only one working until their 24 year old brother gets called back to his job again. Even then, I don't think, that with a combination of income,. that we'd make too much around here. But, if it's enough for us to get reduced down in our food stamps, then, they may consider that being too much as well and deny him for benefits. I'll have to check into that. Thanks for the info.
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  3. sweedly
    sweedly
    Some of the SSI rules and even SSD rules seem to make life harder for those with disabilities. It is a shame when it affects handicapped children who need the extra help but can not get it. I knew a family of whom the mother was disabled and very ill and so her sister took in the children until the mother could get help. Even thou she was way under the poverty level she was denied, yet her sister would have been able to get benefits even thou her and her husbands income was way above the income level. They told SSI what they could do with their money, and just pulled together as a family to help the children. Voted.
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    1. SignLanguage
      LOL! up where the sun don't shine!
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  4. Shabs Online
    Shabs Online
    Very well-researched and informative blog....Good work, Susan...Keep it up! Definitely voted! :)
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you Shabs.You rock too in your writing.
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  5. SignLanguage
    It's good to know, but like you say, this is a crazy system. I mean, 40,000$ per year isn't much - you are comfortable, but can you afford to take care of this child with everything that comes with disabilities? Especially if it's one like diabetes, where the child needs very expensive insuline shots daily, not counting the blood sugar monitor, the strips for the blood tests, the needles for the shots, the alcohol swabs for both, the never-ending visits to doctors and nutritionists.... it adds up so fast! I think it should also depend on how much the parents spend and on what basis. For a Deaf person, you buy the hearing aids and the TTY, then at a certain age, they only need a checkup of their hearing level. That's it. The only time it costs a bit is if the parents want to teach the child to speak, which means visits to the speech therapists, but once that's finished, it's just like any other child. Yet, they will get the same benefits as the one who is diabetic. My God, the system is not well balanced... Sorry for this rant, but this is definitely NOT FAIR. There is so much improvement needed.
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    1. SignLanguage
      Oh, and I have my second part of the Deaf culture articles up! check it out! and I voted for you.
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      1. pftsusan
        pftsusan
        Thank you. And I voted for you too. :-)
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  6. Susan Keeping
    Susan Keeping
    Voted
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you.
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  7. Lil Nana
    Lil Nana
    Voted, sorry for the delay...senior moment
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you dear.
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  8. Rene
    Rene
    Voted. :)
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you for stopping by.
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  9. Broken English
    Broken English
    Voted. Very informative blog. Sad to say, it is no better here in the UK, with the recent changes that the government have brought in.:-( . When you get a chance, come and check out my latest blog, A Disabled Man's Best Friend, and please vote if you like it.
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you and I'm heading right over. This one looks like a good one.
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  10. pftsusan
    pftsusan
    Thank you everyone for voting because DVRS has sent me 40 miles out the way,into another county for testing. 80 miles out of the way round trip. Because of all of you and my writing, I was able to put gas in my car to go home after testing. I couldn't have done this without all of you voting me top posts. This one arrived there at exactly the right time. Again, thank you everyone.
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    1. Broken English
      Broken English
      That's great Susan, glad to hear that! The money I make from blogging is a lifeline to me too, so I always try to support other bloggers as much as I can. I always think that what goes around, comes around.....
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      1. pftsusan
        pftsusan
        So true.
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  11. Akanksha
    Great info. I think you are doing a great job here Susan. I promise to be more regular now..and read posts before they make it to top :P
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    1. pftsusan
      pftsusan
      Thank you for stopping in and voting.
      Log in to reply.

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